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Domaine Maume Gevrey Chambertin en Pallud 2013, 750mL (WA88-90) from The BPW - Merchants of rare and fine wines.

Domaine Maume Gevrey Chambertin en Pallud

750mL

Vintage: 2013
Region: France--Burgundy--Red
Appellation: Gevrey Chambertin, Cote de Nuits

WA88-90
Rated 88-90 points by the Wine Advocate: `Taken from one of six barrels raised in one-third new oak, the 2013 Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud has a slightly withdrawn brambly red berry fruit mixed with a touch of marmalade. The palate is medium-bodied with sappy red berry fruit, moderate acidity, harmonious in the mouth with fine tension on the finish. This actually gets better as it goes on.?` -- Neal Martin in the Dec 2014 Issue of the Wine AdvocateMore information about this producer: `Bertrand Maume is a winemaker who produced what you might call a militantly `classic` style of Burgundy, wines that tended to be hard in their youth, leafy, maybe `stemmy` Pinot Noir that people either loved or loathed. Certainly here in the UK, Maume has a cult following that adore this style. I would probably include myself with them. I have undertaken verticals of Bertrand`s wines that convinced me that this style of Burgundy has a place within the region. The wines need aging and decanting, they need to be treated with care. But they can reward those that do. So when it was absorbed in `Marchand-Tawse`, Pascal Marchand with a reputation for using plenty of new oak, it is little wonder that wine-lovers start speculating about a change in style. And to be honest, I cannot say how the wines will be fashioned in 10 years time because I think Pascal and Mark Fincham are still deciding themselves. There`s two conflicting schools of thought here - they idea is to find a balance between the two. What I would say is that there is clearly no mandate to just start lacquering them in lots of toasty new oak. There is clearly a lot of exchange between Bertrand Maume and the new winemakers, though it is the latter who will make the key decisions. There is certainly an appreciation for Bertrand`s perhaps idiosyncratic approach. The most telling comment was when Mark said to me that he had recently tasted wondrous old vintages of the Mazis-Chambertin with Bertrand, but that you just cannot make wines in that way anymore. So the new owners are still deliberating and of course, considering whether to absorb the name under the `Marchand-Tawse` umbrella. Certainly those loyalists will rue the loss of the Maume name but on the other hand, why maintain the name of someone who ultimately has no connection with the present brand? It`s tricky. What I will say is that their 2013s are commendable, indicative of a measured approach. I admit that I was hoping for a little more complexity apropos that Mazoyeres-Chambertin (formerly Charmes-Chambertin) but I am sure there will be great wines down the line. These were perfectly respectable wines given the growing season but I will be more interested to see how the 2014s turn out, how they approach the maturation. I believe that will be more telling about the future direction, but be sure that I will judged upon the wines in the glass rather than sentimental attachment to a respected grower.?`


$59.00

OUT OF STOCK
Read CellarTracker Wine Reviews

Domaine Maume Gevrey Chambertin en Pallud

750mL

Vintage: 2013
Region: France--Burgundy--Red
Appellation: Gevrey Chambertin, Cote de Nuits

WA88-90
Rated 88-90 points by the Wine Advocate: `Taken from one of six barrels raised in one-third new oak, the 2013 Gevrey-Chambertin En Pallud has a slightly withdrawn brambly red berry fruit mixed with a touch of marmalade. The palate is medium-bodied with sappy red berry fruit, moderate acidity, harmonious in the mouth with fine tension on the finish. This actually gets better as it goes on.?` -- Neal Martin in the Dec 2014 Issue of the Wine AdvocateMore information about this producer: `Bertrand Maume is a winemaker who produced what you might call a militantly `classic` style of Burgundy, wines that tended to be hard in their youth, leafy, maybe `stemmy` Pinot Noir that people either loved or loathed. Certainly here in the UK, Maume has a cult following that adore this style. I would probably include myself with them. I have undertaken verticals of Bertrand`s wines that convinced me that this style of Burgundy has a place within the region. The wines need aging and decanting, they need to be treated with care. But they can reward those that do. So when it was absorbed in `Marchand-Tawse`, Pascal Marchand with a reputation for using plenty of new oak, it is little wonder that wine-lovers start speculating about a change in style. And to be honest, I cannot say how the wines will be fashioned in 10 years time because I think Pascal and Mark Fincham are still deciding themselves. There`s two conflicting schools of thought here - they idea is to find a balance between the two. What I would say is that there is clearly no mandate to just start lacquering them in lots of toasty new oak. There is clearly a lot of exchange between Bertrand Maume and the new winemakers, though it is the latter who will make the key decisions. There is certainly an appreciation for Bertrand`s perhaps idiosyncratic approach. The most telling comment was when Mark said to me that he had recently tasted wondrous old vintages of the Mazis-Chambertin with Bertrand, but that you just cannot make wines in that way anymore. So the new owners are still deliberating and of course, considering whether to absorb the name under the `Marchand-Tawse` umbrella. Certainly those loyalists will rue the loss of the Maume name but on the other hand, why maintain the name of someone who ultimately has no connection with the present brand? It`s tricky. What I will say is that their 2013s are commendable, indicative of a measured approach. I admit that I was hoping for a little more complexity apropos that Mazoyeres-Chambertin (formerly Charmes-Chambertin) but I am sure there will be great wines down the line. These were perfectly respectable wines given the growing season but I will be more interested to see how the 2014s turn out, how they approach the maturation. I believe that will be more telling about the future direction, but be sure that I will judged upon the wines in the glass rather than sentimental attachment to a respected grower.?`


$59.00

OUT OF STOCK
Read CellarTracker Wine Reviews





 

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